Author Topic: Shiitake Question  (Read 610 times)

Offline Eagle

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Shiitake Question
« on: May 30, 2012, 06:47:58 PM »
Ok I've had some Shiitake bags fully colonized for about a month now. This is my first grow with them.. My question is In the bag to brown or take them out? I've left them in the bag (filtered bag) but they dont seem to want to brown for me and they have been 100 percent over a month now. Have seen some "popcorning" but no browning as of yet. Should I pull them out and let them brown outside the bags or what?

Offline g

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Re: Shiitake Question
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2012, 07:16:13 PM »
here's a link for a link on the browning, I don't really try to induce, just sort of happens but all my work is pretty casual and outdoors in season.
http://ediblemushroom.net/index.php/topic,296.msg1862.html#msg1862

Online NSF

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Re: Shiitake Question
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2012, 10:33:13 AM »
Shiitake are for people with patience.  They take at least 3 months to brown fully and then maybe start to popcorn.

In my experience cold shocking prevents blocks from fruiting at all and slapping hasn't produced better yields.

It seems to me that leaving them in the ba as long as possible is best.  When you see caps and stems forming, then remove from the bag and rinse (and continue to spray down daily).

Offline shifabrains

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Re: Shiitake Question
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2012, 11:49:01 AM »
i wait till the bags are at least half browned  this takes at least 10 wks then induce to fruit  by opening the top of the bag and filling it with cold water o/nite  then strip bag and into the grow rm
im not a pheasant plucker im a pheasant pluckers son ill sit here plucking pheasants till the pheasant pluckings done

Offline Eagle

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Re: Shiitake Question
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2012, 01:43:42 AM »
Ok from what I read on that paper and here what others posted it looks like I am leaving them in the bag.. I am pulling them out of incubator for the temp drop that they talk about on that paper the 1st poster posted and covering the gas hole to increase c02 ppm's. I have no choice but be patient, I over guessed now I have about 20 bags of shiitake almost thinking about selling a few off or trading a few. Anyhow thank you so much for the reply's!!

Offline kezzaneedsinfo

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Re: Shiitake Question
« Reply #5 on: July 20, 2012, 09:31:01 PM »
Can anybody tell me if you are pasteurising with steam - what temperature and for how long it should be done for?

(I am hoping to use sawdust substrate for shiitake).

Cheers,
Kezza

Offline g

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Re: Shiitake Question
« Reply #6 on: July 21, 2012, 09:41:04 PM »
I usually do an hour or two depending on a few things such as:

- Type of substrate and contamination risk, things are all pretty much in the area of mushroom advantage until you start supplementing and then all sorts of fungi and bacteria can move in hard and fast, so longer cooks for richer mixes. Longer for denser substrates too.

- Amount loaded into the treatment space, shorter for less longer for more.

- How much inoculant I plan on using, i.e. can inoculate higher into more contam. prone / rich mixes.

My 'steaming' is in a large drum with lid more or less fully on (slightly ajar just to not build up pressure, but closed enough to build up good wet heat but retain heat and moisture too) with a rack supported above an inch or two of water (or whatever is needed for the whole cook, but you don't need huge amounts) in the base, heated by those large black gas camping ring burners. I like it as I use very little water and it heats up quick.

I'd probably go the longer 2 hours for a supplemented shiitake block, don't pack it too hard so you get good steam penetration.
« Last Edit: July 21, 2012, 09:45:19 PM by g »

Offline Northerner

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Re: Shiitake Question
« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2012, 10:00:06 AM »
I usually do an hour or two depending on a few things such as:

- Type of substrate and contamination risk, things are all pretty much in the area of mushroom advantage until you start supplementing and then all sorts of fungi and bacteria can move in hard and fast, so longer cooks for richer mixes. Longer for denser substrates too.

- Amount loaded into the treatment space, shorter for less longer for more.

- How much inoculant I plan on using, i.e. can inoculate higher into more contam. prone / rich mixes.

My 'steaming' is in a large drum with lid more or less fully on (slightly ajar just to not build up pressure, but closed enough to build up good wet heat but retain heat and moisture too) with a rack supported above an inch or two of water (or whatever is needed for the whole cook, but you don't need huge amounts) in the base, heated by those large black gas camping ring burners. I like it as I use very little water and it heats up quick.

I'd probably go the longer 2 hours for a supplemented shiitake block, don't pack it too hard so you get good steam penetration.

A temperature gauge in this setup might be beneficial. Selecting exact pasteurisation temps (65-70) and avoiding sterilising temps (82+) can make a huge difference in contamination rates. I use a metal meat thermometer stuck into my blocks, when the temp hits 60 I turn it down. The temp normally keeps going up (because the outside of the block is hotter than the inside) but levels off at 67ish. Then from that point in time I start a 90 min countdown. If the temp starts to go down a bit I turn the gas up a fraction...

Offline g

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Re: Shiitake Question
« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2012, 05:27:49 PM »
absolutely, it is a very good suggestion. I'm not too fussed at this stage due to limitations, but when i've the space i'll probably look at things a bit more in depth and have the ability for more manipulation via information with temp gauges etc. I don't really get much contamination, but you raise a very good point regarding pasteurisation and sterilisation. Thanks for sharing :)