Author Topic: Omphalotus nidiformis  (Read 3953 times)

Offline Jeff

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Omphalotus nidiformis
« on: June 28, 2013, 12:45:22 PM »
Well from what I understand this is native to Australia so it probably isn't that impressive to most of you guys.
Totally foreign to me though so I thought I would share.  This is my first attempt at with this species.
I love bio-luminescent things.




Offline NSF

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #1 on: June 29, 2013, 09:08:23 AM »
Jeff that's an incredible grow and even more great photographs.

Offline Morrie3

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #2 on: June 29, 2013, 12:32:10 PM »
Nice images  :)

These often get mistaken for edible oyster mushroom by inexperienced people.   I know of a couple of people who have eaten them and been quite sick.

Just recently, a couple of guys contacted me about coming down my way to look for native oyster mushrooms.   Unfortunately, I got the message too late.  They came and went and on the way home picked some Omphalotus which they excitedly reported as Pleurotus australis.   I immediately doubted their ID.   P. australis is quite rare, around here at any rate. 

http://morrie2.wordpress.com/2010/03/09/pleurotis-australis-the-native-oyster-mushroom/

It turns out that they cooked them up and each et a small piece the size of a 5 cent coin.   They reported that the taste was excellent and they did not get sick.   That goes to show that the approach of testing first with a small sample does not necessarily prove that a mushroom is not poisonous in larger doses.

Offline Jeff

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #3 on: June 29, 2013, 01:33:51 PM »
One last pic.



I could see how they would be mistaken for oysters.  They are very similar. 

Offline Darterzezza

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #4 on: June 30, 2013, 05:29:48 AM »
Oh boy. Any links where I can find spores in the US?

Offline Jeff

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #5 on: June 30, 2013, 05:47:29 AM »
If you are in the US I could get you a wedge when I work with it again, that is, unless there is a specific reason you want spores.

Offline shifabrains

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #6 on: July 01, 2013, 01:03:27 PM »
fantastic grow and pics . I have just found a heap of these in a recurring spot , did you clone it and what did you do to get it to fruit anything special ? that is the first time ive seen a fruit from a bag
im not a pheasant plucker im a pheasant pluckers son ill sit here plucking pheasants till the pheasant pluckings done

Offline Jeff

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #7 on: July 02, 2013, 11:00:16 AM »
It was a commercial culture that I got through a trade.  It was surprisingly easy to fruit.  Pasteurized fuel pellets, mixture of oak and fir, with a bit of gypsum.  It pinned in-vitro after about 6 weeks.  Cut the bag out around the pin and introduced it to fruiting conditions.
I know the bio-luminescent guys are useless but I do find them intriguing.   

Offline Bezerker Viking

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #8 on: July 02, 2013, 09:53:08 PM »
nice looking shrooms and great photos too :D

Offline Jeff

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #9 on: July 28, 2013, 02:31:41 AM »
It threw a second flush.  Smaller fruits and not as many.
I only took a few pictures but I liked this one.

Offline Sir Shrooms

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #10 on: September 28, 2013, 10:12:35 PM »
It turns out that they cooked them up and each et a small piece the size of a 5 cent coin.   They reported that the taste was excellent and they did not get sick.   That goes to show that the approach of testing first with a small sample does not necessarily prove that a mushroom is not poisonous in larger doses.

Just like eating Sorrel. Small amounts, a few leaves taste great.  But, if you juice an entire bowl you're in for trouble.  Andrew Weil once said, "there are old mushroom pickers and bold mushroom pickers, but there are no old bold mushroom pickers".  He went on to state that he believed it was ok to sample the flavour of a unknown mushroom so long as it was never swallowed - a bold risk.

Offline Revajonuners

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Re: Omphalotus nidiformis
« Reply #11 on: February 23, 2019, 12:35:42 PM »
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