Author Topic: Lime soak success!  (Read 5306 times)

Offline omsource

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Lime soak success!
« on: August 23, 2013, 02:13:03 PM »
I've had such great success with this technique recently that I had to start a blog about it!

http://www.fungiculture.com.au/blogs/how-to/8735745-lime-pasteurising-straw


Here's some pics of oysters that have been grown this way...no hot water, no steam just an 18h soak and off we grow.
Very exciting developments. It means that the only upper limit to growing is our fruiting environment and the size of our soak tank...I've seen a great set-up on Aloha's website of a commercial farm growing with the Lime soak tek and a 1000L IBC (water tank) meaning they could process bales! of straw in one go.

Keep the spawn rate higher than normal (I hit 10%) and be sure your strain is a fast coloniser and you'll do fine!











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Offline jhorn

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2013, 02:55:05 PM »
 :o
That is fascinating!!
Have you tried this with any other substrates or mushroom types?

Offline omsource

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #2 on: August 23, 2013, 03:53:34 PM »
I'm just trialling straw and coffee grounds (pretty rich mix so we'll see..)
should work well with sugar cane bagasse, and I've seen someone pull off sawdust just using enough lime water to bring it to the proper hydration.

I'm not sure how well it'd work for other species out of the oyster family cause the PH is off the scale...well almost  :o
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Offline NSF

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #3 on: August 23, 2013, 04:33:35 PM »
Thanks for posting this tek, it's something I'd like to try myself.  Although it's far less energy consuming how is it environmentally?  Where can you put all that water with its screwed pH?  The mushrooms show no ill effects but do they have a taint or different taste?


Offline jhorn

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #4 on: August 23, 2013, 05:32:19 PM »
Believe it or not, hydrated lime(Calcium hydroxide) is actually used alot in the food industry.
Not sayin I TRUST the food industry! Just sayin they use alot of it  ::)
The wast water  PH could probably be rebalanced with vinegar.
I wounder how long you could reuse the water before it got too funky?
I think i must try this.
Thanks for the link and confirmation of results!!

Offline jhorn

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #5 on: August 23, 2013, 06:00:39 PM »
I wounder if this would work with other mushrooms if after the lime soak, the substrate PH was rebalanced with a short soak in water/vinegar solution?? Or maybe water/lemon juice?

Offline omsource

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #6 on: August 23, 2013, 07:43:37 PM »
Thanks for posting this tek, it's something I'd like to try myself.  Although it's far less energy consuming how is it environmentally?  Where can you put all that water with its screwed pH?  The mushrooms show no ill effects but do they have a taint or different taste?

oops forgot to mention...the big insight from john at Aloha was that you can keep reusing the water indefinitely.
He recommended only to use just enough limed water to cover your substrate and then top up whats left re-lime and away you go. No waste water to dispose of!

I haven't noticed a taste issue...the mycelium exudes metabolites that actually buffer the Ph bringing it back down to near neutral by the time they fruit.

much more economical and environmentally sustainable due to no gas/electricity being burned to pasteurise.
Fungi Culture now stocks gourmet mushroom spawn; grain spawn, dowel spawn and outdoor mushroom patches!
www.fungiculture.com.au
info@fungiculture.com.au
Simple.Sustainable.Nutritious

Offline Morrie3

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2013, 12:20:52 AM »
I wounder if this would work with other mushrooms if after the lime soak, the substrate PH was rebalanced with a short soak in water/vinegar solution?? Or maybe water/lemon juice?
Hydrated lime will in time absorb carbon dioxide from the air and form calcium carbonate which is the same as ordinary limestone or chalk.   As a pollutant, it isn't really a big problem providing you can spread it out and let it carbonate.  Fire ash is highly alkaline too, due in part to the presence of calcium oxide (which forms hydrated lime when water is added) and partly due to potassium carbonate.  I wonder if in fact fire ash would do the same job as a treatment.  When fire ash is thrown out, it simply carbonates.  Anything that is alkaline, when exposed to carbon dioxide, will tend towards neutral pH over time.  This is different from acidic wastes, which cannot react with the atmosphere.

The same thing will happen with residual hydrated lime in a substrate.   If exposed to air,  it will form calcium carbonate.  This will have a pH of around 8.2.  This will then react very slowly with carbon dioxide and water to form calcium bicarbonate, which has a neutral pH.  Any fermentation in the substrate that forms acidic products will also react with it.

I know people who have used hydrated lime on their truffles, but in the long run it has the same pH altering effect as agricultural lime, due to carbonation.

Concrete is full of hydrated lime in the form of a gel.   In concrete water tanks, this hydrated lime is transported into cracks where it carbonates and seals the tank.

« Last Edit: August 25, 2013, 12:32:25 AM by Morrie3 »

Offline NSF

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2013, 12:34:03 PM »
I wonder whether you've touched on morels here Morrie.  Maybe calcium in one form or another is important, as outdoor grow teks I've seen all talk about fire ash.  Yep, I just hi-jacked the thread, my bad.

Offline Morrie3

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #9 on: August 27, 2013, 09:55:27 AM »
I wonder whether you've touched on morels here Morrie.  Maybe calcium in one form or another is important, as outdoor grow teks I've seen all talk about fire ash.  Yep, I just hi-jacked the thread, my bad.
Yep, I have found morels growing in several situations where there was lime.   Once, where someone had washed out a wheelbarrow after carting concrete, and in another case where someone had built a large limestone wall, with cement joins, on lime/sand coastal soil.   As well as after fires of course.

Offline NSF

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #10 on: August 27, 2013, 10:17:56 AM »
OK Morrie...so what sort of lime, in what phase should I be looking to add to some morel substrate? 

Do I want some freshly burned (and cooled) wood?  Do I want some ash that's been weathered?  Do I want some lime? 

How is morel season looking in WA at the minute?  A cold snap here (with the requisite rains) has pushed the morel season back a week or so in Victoria.  The last couple of sunny days should rectify things though.  If we get one more good down pour and more sun I'll be out there looking. 

Offline Shrooman

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2013, 08:58:16 PM »
Hey omsource,

great info, love the pics.
Curious as to what sort of B.E. you are getting with the lime soak?
Also do you just get 1 flush or multiples?

I had some success with bagasse and white oysters, not sure how far off the max efficiency i was though  ???

Offline WildFerment

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #12 on: October 20, 2016, 11:14:51 AM »
Ugh !  Whats happened to www.fungiculture.com.au ??
I'm interested in the liming process

Offline NSF

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #13 on: October 20, 2016, 11:44:19 AM »
I'm pretty sure Om got out of mushrooming. 

Offline Shrooman

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Re: Lime soak success!
« Reply #14 on: March 17, 2017, 11:25:03 AM »
Lime soaking was the bulk of what I did for white oysters - cheap, easy, practical.
I plan to setup again once we've moved house, but this time setup with a timer, valve and pump so that I can setup before I go to bed, then when I get up in the morning it's ready to inoculate and bag up :)