Author Topic: Hunter Valley's EXCELLENT guide (Australia)  (Read 4451 times)

Offline NSF

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Hunter Valley's EXCELLENT guide (Australia)
« on: May 26, 2014, 10:35:55 AM »
A really well laid out and thorough field guide.  I've gone to the effort of printing it, saving it and now distributing it.  It's really very good, wish there were more like it, especially for the price!

http://hunter.lls.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0009/516807/guide-to-common-fungi-hcr.pdf

Offline golmuso

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Re: Hunter Valley's EXCELLENT guide (Australia)
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2014, 02:31:22 PM »
That's a really great find..thanks for sharing. Good combo of info/photos and explanations.


I'd always tried to use this one before but i think yours is more relevant to Aus.

http://www.rogersmushrooms.com/gallery/VisualKey_p2.asp

Offline NSF

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Re: Hunter Valley's EXCELLENT guide (Australia)
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2014, 04:44:21 PM »
It's pretty good, probably great from a most frequent species point of view but I'm amazed it doesn't mention morchella sp.  I would have thought Hypholoma sublateritium would sneak in there too.  No Agaricus in the agarics section is weird, as is a lack of Suillus and Leucoagaricus.  Oh and Tricholoma terreum. 

Offline golmuso

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Re: Hunter Valley's EXCELLENT guide (Australia)
« Reply #3 on: May 26, 2014, 08:45:58 PM »
I could only assume that with no agaricus, maybe they were trying to stay away from potential edibles/poison confusions. Very little on Boletes in general which seems odd. No Morels..maybe trying to keep people clear of flocking there to raid the forest floor? Haha. Still,a good general guide though.

Offline Morrie3

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Re: Hunter Valley's EXCELLENT guide (Australia)
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2014, 08:27:04 PM »
(Whoops, please disregard the comment about Gaye.  She posts under the name Hunter Valley and I incorrectly assumed that is what you were referring to)

http://australianfungi.blogspot.com.au/
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I have met Gaye.  Her site is indeed an excellent one for identification of different mushrooms.   She is very thorough in her descriptions.   You are correct however that she steers away from discussion of edible species.   In fact she links to my blog in this respect.

She doesn't appear to have been active for several years.  I am not sure why.

While my blog, accessible under my avatar, is not exhaustive nor does it contain detailed descriptions, it is concerned with edible mushrooms and those easily confused with edible species.   There are at least 20 species I know of that I have not covered yet.  Most of those don't occur in WA.   However, there is another blogger based in Brisbane who has started up a blog with some of the east coast species in it.  Hopefully, he will expand this as time goes by. 


http://mushroaming.wordpress.com/

I'd like to get over east and include some more species.

All up, there are well over 50 edible species here in Oz.   I must say that I am astounded at how poor people are at identifying edible fungi though.  Do be careful, anyone who wants to try picking from the wild.
« Last Edit: May 28, 2014, 10:41:40 PM by Morrie3 »

Offline golmuso

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Re: Hunter Valley's EXCELLENT guide (Australia)
« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2014, 11:46:47 AM »
Thanks for the Links Morrie3. I have Gaye's blog saved on my bookmarks, and is a great reference (though as noted, hasn't been active for a while!)

You are right about being poor with Identifying, to which i won't exclude myself with this. Coming from a very conservative background (don't touch that it's a toadstool, don't eat that pine mushroom it's deadly etc haha). I always take caution when identifying and never eat until i'm 99% certain (the 1% i leave there because i don't have anyone around me that eats wild mushrooms, nor have a ever seen any other mushrooms before 2months ago, so doubt will always be there until i sleep well that night after eating).

Keep these tools and blogs coming. I'm always happy just being out there, bushwalking, and spotting/attempting to ID any mushroom i can.

P.s What's the Mushroom season like in WA? I visit quite regularly as i have family over there, so pretty keen to head out to some spots in June/July.


Offline Morrie3

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Re: Hunter Valley's EXCELLENT guide (Australia)
« Reply #6 on: May 30, 2014, 07:41:20 PM »
Thanks for the Links Morrie3. I have Gaye's blog saved on my bookmarks, and is a great reference (though as noted, hasn't been active for a while!)

You are right about being poor with Identifying, to which i won't exclude myself with this. Coming from a very conservative background (don't touch that it's a toadstool, don't eat that pine mushroom it's deadly etc haha). I always take caution when identifying and never eat until i'm 99% certain (the 1% i leave there because i don't have anyone around me that eats wild mushrooms, nor have a ever seen any other mushrooms before 2months ago, so doubt will always be there until i sleep well that night after eating).

Keep these tools and blogs coming. I'm always happy just being out there, bushwalking, and spotting/attempting to ID any mushroom i can.

P.s What's the Mushroom season like in WA? I visit quite regularly as i have family over there, so pretty keen to head out to some spots in June/July.
Its hard to say what the mushroom season is like really.   It depends where you look and when.   I haven't seen any field mushrooms this year, but then that might be where I am looking.  They tend to be early in the season.

Soon we should get Armillaria luteobubalina and Chantarelles.  Later on there will be Hydnum repandum and later again, morels.  The Suillus are up already but they have several flushes.

I have limited availability in July, but should be around in June.   PM me if you are in the South West and I will be happy to have a look around with you.

Offline golmuso

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Re: Hunter Valley's EXCELLENT guide (Australia)
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2014, 12:50:23 AM »

Its hard to say what the mushroom season is like really.   It depends where you look and when.   I haven't seen any field mushrooms this year, but then that might be where I am looking.  They tend to be early in the season.

Soon we should get Armillaria luteobubalina and Chantarelles.  Later on there will be Hydnum repandum and later again, morels.  The Suillus are up already but they have several flushes.

I have limited availability in July, but should be around in June.   PM me if you are in the South West and I will be happy to have a look around with you.
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Still, that's a great start for me. My chef 'dream' is to find some Chantarelles and cook myself a meal out of them, so they would be amazing to scout out :P. Also looking forward to the Hydnum repandum. They seem really interesting. What do they taste/cook up like (texture etc) ?  Still haven't lucked out on any Suillus as yet here unfortunately.

I would love to take you up on that offer too. I really appreciate it. I will shoot over a PM when i find out my next time off/trip to perth and see if we can organize something. I only just realized i have had your blog bookmarked since i first started my obsession with everything fungi..some really great info on there!